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There are many simple things you can do in 
your own back yard that will invite 
and protect pollinators!  


  • Plant plenty of nectar- and pollen-rich flowers.
By choosing a variety of colors and shapes you can attract 
hummingbirds and nectar seeking insects.  Extend the blooming
 season by planting flowers that will bloom at varying times of the year.

  • Provide food sources (host plants) and overwintering places for 
  • eggs and larvae. 
Although adult pollinators rely on nectar and pollen to sustain them, the insect larval stage is often quite particular about which leaves it eats. Monarch Caterpillars, for example, will ONLY eat 
milkweed.  Don't forget to invest in host plants as well as nectar blossoms.

  • Provide water.
Butterflies and other insects will sip at mud puddles and bird baths.  Additionally, mud puddles provide minerals for some pollinators, such as butterflies, and provides building supplies for insects which make their homes out of mud.

  • Avoid using pesticides and herbicides.
Some "weeds" provide a food source, both pollen and nectar, for pollinators.  If you feel you MUST control weeds and pests, choose organic home remedies.  Use them after dark after the pollinator insects have gone to bed.

  • Provide sites and materials for nesting and overwintering. 
While the Monarch Butterfly copes with cold winters by migrating to the more hospitable sanctuaries of Mexico, not all insects have the same option.  Small brush and leaf piles can provide winter cover.  Nest boxes for some types of bees can be created and placed, and bats will appreciate shelter in a bat house of their own.  

Plants that Attract Pollinators

Aster (Aster)
Basil (Ocimum)
Bee balm (Monardia)
Black-eyed Susan (Rudbeckia)
Borage (Borago)
Caltrop (Kallstroemia)
Cotoneaster (Cotoneaster)
English Lavender (Lavandula)
Escallonia (Escallonia)
Globe thistle (Echinops)
Goldenrod (Solidago)
Hyssop (Hyssopus)
Joe-pye weed (Eupatorium)
Larkspur (Delphinium)
Licorice Mint (Agastache)
Lupine (Lupinus)
Marjoram (Origanum)
Mexican sunflower (Tithonia)
Milkweed (Asclepias)
Mint (Mentha)
Rocky Mountain Bee Plant (Cleome)
Rhododendron (Rhododendron)
Rosemary (Rosmarinus)
Russian Sage (Perovskia)
Sage (Salvia)
Stonecrop (Sedum)
Sunflower (Helianthus)
Wallflower (Erysimum)
Wild lilac (Ceanothus)
Yarrow (Achillea)
Zinnia (Zinnia)


Hummingbird Nectar Recipe

1 part sugar
4 parts water

Boil together and let cool before using.  Be sure to change and clean the feeder every couple of days to prevent mold 
and bacteria from 
growing.  NEVER use honey.

CREATING A POLLINATOR FRIENDLY GARDEN
HOW DOES YOUR GARDEN GROW?
 Butterfly Host Plants
"Caterpillar Food"
 
Anise Swallowtail   
Sweet Fennel, Lomatium, Citrus  
Black swallowtail 
Dill, parsley, fennel, carrot 
Buckeye 
plantains, gerardias, toadflax,  snapdragons, false loosestrifes 
Cabbage White  
plants in mustard family, cabbage family  
Checkered skipper    
Mallow, hollyhock 
Checkered white     
Tumble mustard 
Clouded sulfur      
Alfalfa, clover 
Cloudless Sulfur  
Ornamental Cassia, Canary Bird Bush   
Common hairstreak 
mallow family , hollyhock , rose and marsh mallows  
Common Snout Butterfly   Hackberry 
Eastern Tiger Swallowtail 
sycamore, willow  
Cabbage White 
Broccoli, cabbage (mustard family) 
Monarch Butterfly
Milkweed 
Mourning cloak 
Willow, aspen, cottonwood, elm 
Orange sulfur 
Alfalfa, vetch, pea 
Painted Lady 
Thistle, hollyhock, sunflower Red Admiral  
nettle, false nettle, pellitor   Silver-spotted skipper 
Wild licorice, locust  Spicebush Swallowtail 
spice bush, sassafras 
Two-tailed swallowtail 
Green ash, chokecherry 
Viceroy Butterfly 
willow, poplar, apple 
Western tiger swallowtail 
Willow, cottonwood, chokecherry 
Zebra Swallowtail  
Pawpaw  


Have you planted YOUR milkweed, yet?  }i{  
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Dan says, "You can build it!"
  • LAND DESIGN ALTERNATIVES, INC
     These folks are experts in environmentally 
friendly landscape design

 MULCH MADNESS!

As we continue to seek environmentally friendly ways to prevent weeds and conserve water, many of us have inadvertently removed or covered nesting sites for our ground nesting pollinators.  Where once was a bare patch of dirt, now a thick layer of  mulch or plastic weed barrier prevents these insects from excavating tunnels in which to raise brood.  Add to this the list of other dirt covers - concrete, pavement, lawns, buildings - coupled with chemical controls of pests and weeds and it's a wonder these ground nesting bees ever set up house in urban settings!

Try cutting back on the use of mulch.  Set aside a section of bare dirt that ground nesting bees and other useful organisms can claim as their own.  Set goals to reduce and then hopefully eliminate the use of herbicides and pesticides.  Incorporating pollinator friendly practices into your garden maintenance makes a healthier environment for YOU as well.  

 
  • BAT BOX
  • NESTING BEE HOUSE
  • BUMBLEBEE NEST BOX


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